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7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley on August 14, 2018

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day.

To create our list, we focused on the top books Goodreads members can't wait to read, which we measure by how many times a book has been added to Want to Read shelves. All these highly anticipated titles are now available! Which ones catch your eye?


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You should read this book if you like: Fiction, bank robberies, unflinching portrayals of the opioid crisis, war veterans, the dark heart of America, powerful prose, black humor

Walker wrote his debut novel in prison. Check out the books he's read behind bars that have made a difference to him.


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You should read this book if you like: Science fiction, The Three-Body Problem, mysterious natural phenomena, scientific quests, particle physics, experimental military weapons labs



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You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, The Deverill Chronicles, Ireland, countesses and castles, long-held secrets, epic romance, preserving family legacy



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You should read this book if you like: Mysteries, legal thrillers, the Rosata & Dinunzio series, twisted murder investigations, taking down ruthless enemies, Machiavellian schemes



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You should read this book if you like: Memoirs, intimate family portraits, the Hamptons, wedding weekends, grappling with questions of loyalty and tradition, dysfunctional relatives



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You should read this book if you like: Dystopian fiction, apocalyptic satire, millennial drones, plagues of Biblical proportions, quirky "coming-of-adulthood" stories, survivors

Discover more exciting new voices with our roundup of the best debuts of the season!


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You should read this book if you like: Contemporary romance, Swear on This Life, unhappy suburban housewives, life-changing kisses, surprisingly seductive psych studies, electric chemistry




Back-to-School Reading for Adults: The Best New Nonfiction
Posted by Hayley on August 13, 2018

Who says old dogs can't learn new tricks? Inspired by all the kids heading back to school, we rounded up the best recently published books for curious grown-ups.

Whether you're eager to know more about the planet or politics, want to change the world or yourself, we've got you covered. To find the most educational and entertaining books published from January to August of this year, we focused on the books that have been added the most to Goodreads members' shelves. Then we narrowed down our list to contain only books with at least a four-star average rating.

Ready to hit the books? Check out the recommendations, divided by subject matter, and add what catches your eye to your Want to Read shelf.


Recent Events 101

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History 101

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Self Help 101

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True Crime 101

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Business 101

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Present Matters 101

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Parenting 101

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Science 101

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Planet Earth 101

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Politics 101

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The Future 101

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12 Things Readers Really Want Nonreaders to Know
Posted by Hayley on August 10, 2018



Every reader has friends or family members who just don't get it. "Why do you read so much?" they might ask, staring at your overflowing bookshelves or your Reading Challenge on Goodreads. "I haven't read an entire book in years."

Oh, those poor, unfortunate souls… Haven't they heard about the very real scientific benefits of reading—like stress reduction and improved sleep? We asked our followers on Facebook and Twitter to share one thing about the comfort, joy, and importance of reading they wish nonreaders could understand. Check out some of our favorite responses below!


1. "Best therapy money can buy…or borrow for free with a library card. Reading helps me sleep, helps me forget about the day, and helps me relax in general." -Sarah

2. "Opening a beer when you get home will reward you for an hour. Opening a book when you get home will reward you for life." -Douglass

3. "Reading teaches you empathy, and it really gives you a chance to examine all the grey areas of life. You get to think about and see things from other perspectives—it's awesome!" -Nyeisha

4. "I feel like I have friends all over the world, through space and time, who I can visit whenever I need a break from my own life." -Kat

5. "Books are better than the movie. There is so much going on in the minds of the characters that movies can't show. To really understand the movie characters you love, read the book." -Linda

6. "The smells of books, whether they're new and old, are enjoyable and pair well with tea or coffee. People who are loathe to read are missing out on smell-o-vision." -Ian

7. "It's one of the ultimate escapes. You can forget where you are and who you are. There have been times I've gone to Middle-earth and Hogwarts and Narnia in my head just to survive… Everyone should have that blessed escape." -Ruby

8. "The more I read the easier it is to express what I am thinking or feeling. Thanks to books, I have the words." -Melanie

9. "You will always have friends. Real life doesn't always hand you the right people. But a book is the perfect place to find your people whenever you need them." -Gillian

10. "Don't give up on reading just because you tried one or two books that didn't do it for you. Keep trying, and I'm sure you will find your niche or genre. When you do, you'll be so glad you did!" -Wes

11. "Reading to me is like unconditional love. I always feel like I'm home when I read a book." -Susan

12. "Used correctly, a book can transport the reader on an instant mental vacation with no jet lag, TSA, or dysentery!" -Todd


Tell us how you share your love of books with nonreaders in the comments!

Check out more recent blogs:
7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Published from Prison: The Books That Inspired a Former Bank Robber
20 Hottest Debuts of the Season


Don't Get Stuck in Your Genre: How War Movies and Zombies Inspired a Romance Novelist
Posted by Hayley on August 09, 2018

You know what you like, right? Kristen Ashley thought she did. The bestselling romance author, whose books like Mystery Man and Rock Chick have earned more than a million ratings from readers on Goodreads, wanted her stories sweet, sultry, and always full of heart. Then she let a series of gritty films and one sexy apocalypse change her mind. Here Ashley shares how she expanded her reading horizons and why she thinks you should branch out, too.



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I once made an insane deal with my boyfriend: I promised him I'd watch ten movies, whatever he recommended—no excuses not to watch.

He knew my preferences. I liked romantic and feel-good films, or anything with strong female characters, like Billy Elliott and Practical Magic. He also knew I never watched horror, prison, suspense, or war movies. I just found them hard to take.

The first three films he "made" me watch? Rear Window, edge-of-your-seat suspense; Cool Hand Luke, a prison movie; and The Hill, a prisoner-of-war movie. Ugh.

But guess what? They were all superb, so good that they redefined my way of thinking.

I learned not to shut the door on things I didn't think I could enjoy. And thank God, or I never would have watched the brilliant Get Out and so many other films along the way.

Why am I talking movies on a book lovers' forum? Because I so often hear the same things said about the subgenres in romance. "I've read everything you've written, except your fantasy. I don't read fantasy." Then, later: "I had to read another of your books, so I tried your fantasy. I loved it!"

I, too, was recently confronted with this by a book from my friend, and a writer I very much enjoy, Kylie Scott. Her book Flesh is a ménage romance set in—wait for it—the months after a zombie apocalypse.

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I don't normally do zombies. Now I was going to read a zombie apocalypse ménage romance?

I thought about that question for a good five minutes. The answer was yes.

And then I couldn't put the book down. Kylie writes action like you would not believe. I was right there in the apocalypse. One would think they wouldn't want to be right there, after the collapse of civilization, but I was sorry to see the story end. I bought the next book, Skin, immediately. I devoured that, pun intended, and read the short story and novella from the series, all the while begging Kylie to write more.

Her Flesh series reminded me how we can get stuck in what we know, and what we know we like, and not venture out to things that might just rock our worlds.

Along those lines, I was honored to read an advance copy of Consumed by J.R. Ward, the master of the vampire novel and the woman behind the Black Dagger Brotherhood. Consumed has nothing to do with vampires or anything paranormal, but instead focuses on firefighters and SWAT team members, exploring contemporary issues that include family relationships and gender inequality. It was fantastic.

Then there's Joey W. Hill's Natural Law. This phenomenal book inspired me to write a femme domme erotica series of my own. It's not something I'd ever thought I'd do. I think Hill's is better; Joey is a master of the craft. I've since read a number of her astonishingly good novels, and they're not to be missed.

And I'll also add Jenn Bennett, who has her Roaring Twenties series. It's a little bit historical, a little bit mystical, a little bit fantastical, and a whole lot readable. Grim Shadows (the second in the series, and my favorite) has a scene in a museum that's just awesome. I'll say no more. Just read it.

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Onward to the anthology that is sadly no longer available, The Devil's Doorbell, which was my intro to romance shorts and novellas, something I never thought I'd like. But I found it was what was missing in my busy life, the life of a writer and a reader who doesn't have a lot of time to lose myself in books, which is how I like to read. These stories were all exceptional. Every last one. And this experience led me to write for the fabulous 1,001 Dark Nights anthology.

And, of course, there's my favorite subgenre, historical romance. Judith McNaught, my ultimate, still reigns supreme. Her books stand the test of time, and if you haven't discovered her, you should, starting with A Kingdom of Dreams. Vintage romance still rocks it.

Loving historical romances, but having ventured away from them, I was a little concerned things would be different when I started reading Elizabeth Hoyt's Wicked Intentions. What had my time away done to my favorite subgenre? Suffice it to say, after a day and a half lost with my nose in Hoyt's book, I can say nothing's changed. Historical romances are still as brilliant as they always were, though thankfully a lot steamier.

So I urge you to branch out with your reading, too. Zombies? Yes! Don't like werewolves? Give them another shot. Do you scroll past an African American romance because it's something you've just never tried? Stop scrolling and give it a click, baby. Adore your second-chance love stories? They'll be waiting for you, but why not pop over to a hockey romance first?

Of course, to find the one for you, do your research. Read reviews. Ask your Goodreads friends.

And open your mind. It may change your world in a very good way.

Kristen Ashley's latest book, Wild Like the Wind, is now available. Add it to your Want to Read shelf here.



7 Great Books Hitting Shelves Today
Posted by Hayley on August 07, 2018

Need another excuse to go to the bookstore this week? We've got you covered with the buzziest new releases of the day.

To create our list, we focused on the top books Goodreads members can't wait to read, which we measure by how many times a book has been added to Want to Read shelves. All these highly anticipated titles are now available! Which ones catch your eye?


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You should read this book if you like: Thrillers, The Couple Next Door, the perfect getaway turned perfect nightmare, murder mysteries, getting snowed in, And Then There Were None

Check out our interview with Lapena here.


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You should read this book if you like: YA fiction, DC Comics, A Court of Thorns and Roses and Throne of Glass, thieves and vigilantes, Harley Quinn, dangerous missions



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You should read this book if you like: Nonfiction, understanding the American opioid crisis, unforgettable portraits of families and first responders, hope and solutions



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You should read this book if you like: Contemporary fiction, The Regulars, life-changing adventures, humor through heartache, sensual exploration, discovering the future you really want



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You should read this book if you like: Essays, the Maeve in America podcast, fearless and laugh-out-loud reflections on being a woman, New York City, awkward questions



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You should read this book if you like: Historical fiction, Two Rivers, novels based on true stories, Vladimir Nabokov's classic and controversial Lolita, true crime

Find Greenwood's book recommendations here.


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You should read this book if you like: History, Outside Shot, the daring sport of airplane racing, women breaking the glass ceiling, trailblazing heroes




The 20 Hottest Debuts of the Season
Posted by Cybil on August 06, 2018



Rejoice, readers! We're in debut season—that time of year when publishing houses tend to print a delightfully large number of new writers. And this year, between July and September, is proving to be a gold mine of authors to discover.

If you're in the mood for historical fiction, Heather Morris' World War II love story The Tattooist of Auschwitz is already an international hit. Or perhaps your reading will take you to Colombia during the time of drug lord Pablo Escobar's reign in Fruit of the Drunken Tree.

For readers looking for some fantasy, check out The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock, set in 18th-century London, or head deep into a magical forest with the adult fairy tale The Sisters of the Winter Wood. For a dash of magical realism, turn to She Would Be King, a fantastical take on Liberia’s formation.

There's also some dystopia (Vox), an evil child (Baby Teeth), and a war hero-turned-bank robber-turned debut author's gritty first novel (Cherry). In short, you're bound to find a book for whatever reading mood you're in.

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Published from Prison: The Books that Inspired a Former Bank Robber
Posted by Cybil on August 06, 2018



This month, Nico Walker's first novel will be published. But the author's personal story has already captured the attention of readers, beginning with a 2013 Buzzfeed profile titled How a War Hero Became a Serial Bank Robber. A former U.S. Army medic who served on more than 250 missions in Iraq, Walker returned home suffering from severe PTSD and became addicted to heroin. That's when he started robbing small Midwestern banks, hitting ten in all before being caught and sentenced to 11 years in prison. While behind bars, he wrote Cherry. He has two more years left on his sentence.

Goodreads asked Walker to share the books he's read in prison that have made a difference to him.



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I didn't always read much. But I did read. When I was a kid, I liked Joyce and Vonnegut and some others. I liked e.e. cummings—always it's Spring and everyone's in love and flowers pick themselves. (You see.)

I liked stuff like that.

I stole a copy of the Cherry Orchard by Chekhov. I just wanted it. It's still somewhere, I think. If my mom saved it. (She doesn't know it's stolen.)

So I read.

But I wasn't what you'd call a reader. I got into other things. There were times I hardly read at all. It wasn't till I came around to jail, where I've been for years now, that I really got the habit bad. I read for hours every day now. My eyes aren't what they used to be, and I wonder if that doesn't have anything to do with it. But eyes or no eyes, I read a lot these days. I don't know. I can't picture life without books. I love them. I love the good writers. There are so many good writers. The time it would take to read them all, I'll be dead before I could.

But maybe.

I'll have to hurry, though.

Right now I'm reading Turgenev's Sketches. My first time reading it. I'm 33 years old, and I don't know how I got by this long without reading this book. I wonder, What took me so long to get here?

The spirit of the thing is beautiful. It overflows with love. And like all good books, it confirms all kinds of various things that you knew but you didn't know you knew, that you hadn't ever brought out and put into words before, though they were there for a long time, dormant down in your soul somewhere. The eternal truths. The ones that when one of them gets found out, you say, Yeah that is it, isn't it.

And we all know.

So Turgenev's been dead over a hundred years and he's speaking directly to my soul these days (by way of a translator, who also probably is long dead), and that's something of a miracle, I think. And that's what all the real art does, whether it's books or paintings or songs or what-have-you: art. Yet what's special about books is the reader's making it up just as much as the writer. The writer leaves the directions, but the reader does the work; the reader's the one who's got to picture how the things go. And it's the reader's having a share in the creativity that makes books different from the other mediums. When a book connects with a reader, then the reader becomes the writer. There's no deeper contact in art than that, I don't believe.

But this is neither here nor there. And I'm going on. I've been asked to put together a list of the five most formative books that I read in jail. I'm supposed to tie them in somehow with my own book, Cherry, so forgive me when I do that. And I'm sorry that there can only be five books on the list.

The list goes:


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1. A Disaffection by James Kelman

It's about a guy, Patrick Doyle, and he isn't doing so well. He's got ideals he can't live up to. He can't reconcile himself with the nature of what's around him. It's Scotland, maybe the 1980s. Patrick's teaching school, and it's got him feeling like he's the polis. Patrick's origins are working class, and he doesn't like the polis. Not at all. So there's that. Then there's he's in love with a married woman. He feels a need to disappear. This is how the story begins.

It's told beautifully. The writing's second to none. It's vivid. It's dynamic. Kelman writes with a militant conviction that's balanced by a careful sensitivity. Also his jokes don't miss.

I love his technique. He takes chances with the language, and it's brilliant, so if you're into that, then you're in luck because there's plenty. He'll honor sound before syntax when he has to. And it's all poetry. The prose is lyrical. And the dialogue reads natural, and it's subtle. He's got a fine sense of how to increase the tension with it.


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I cannot say enough about this book. The way it ends is genius. I won't tell you about it because you need to read it. I'll warn you, though: Don't read it if you're the type who's gonna say, "Why, there's no commas in this!" Or if you're gonna say, "Not much plot here really," then don't read it. It isn't meant for you. This book's meant for people with sensitivity and love and compassion, who are interested in what's real and true.

The reason I thought I could get away with including A Disaffection on this list of books, a list of books I'm supposed to tie in with Cherry somehow, is Kelman's book, like mine, deals with depression, the morbid kind, the kind that beats you and that you might carry with you all your life. And Kelman works miracles with the subject, how he delivers the most expressive account of a condition that usually leaves most all its experts at a loss for words because they're tired and they don't care anymore. Yeah, Kelman's a hero of mine.

2. Hill William by Scott McClanahan

People sometimes ask me how much of Cherry was real. And they're all right, but I don't love it when they ask me that. What's worse is sometimes they'll even say, "Oh, but this is just an autobiography!" Like they know something. And usually these are people who haven't ever had to worry much about structuring a novel or anything like that. God bless them.

So go on, you say.


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All right. Where I'm going with this is I imagine Scott McClanahan maybe has the same bad luck as I do sometimes, and people will say all he's doing is writing about himself and his life and it's easy. Well, I can tell you, I know Scott McClanahan, and Scott McClanahan knows more about book writing than rooms full of people who would call themselves writers. And Scott writes novels. And they're beautiful.

But sometimes you pay a price for writing what you know or for using the first person or for being authentic and giving people some truth.

Anyway.

I've included a McClanahan novel on this list. It's called Hill William, and it's a masterpiece. If you haven't read it already, you really should. It is one of the funniest, saddest, most powerful, most not-scared-of-anything novels you'll ever read, and it's amazing. Scott writes like Walt Whitman. I'm not lying or exaggerating. And the way the novel is structured is brilliant.

Read this. You'll remember it forever.

3. Panama by Thomas McGuane

Cherry is a love story. So is this one. And it just howls. It's like what would happen if Dostoyevsky lived in Florida in the 1970s and did coke. And then you've got McGuane's chops. No one's got better chops than McGuane.


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When you read this, watch how he shifts back and forth between the main narrative and the backstory on the same page and in the same chapter and stays in the same tense throughout, just a simple past tense, and you follow him around and you don't even know. I read it three times before I picked up on this. He won't even transition with a sentence in a perfect tense. It's so rock 'n' roll.

But to the heart of the matter, I've read some things people have written about this book where they try and tell you McGuane's guilty of taking the piss here, so to speak. But whatever; they just missed what's going on, is all. There's heart in this story, and it's real. Only McGuane, he's not gonna be heavy about it; he's gonna lay it down with style, and he's cool about it. Because that's what he does.

4. Angels by Denis Johnson

This is a book about some people. Like in Cherry, there're some robberies in it.

Denis Johnson died last year. He's one of the greatest writers who ever lived, someone who understood what human beings are like. Angels was Denis Johnson's first novel. The writing is beautiful. It's first-rate, and it'll break your heart if you're paying attention. It's a love song about desperation.

5. Life and Fate by Vasily Grossman


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I read this book a few years ago. And I was working on Cherry, and things weren't going incredibly well with that. So then sometimes when I'd get to feeling bad regarding what was difficult about writing in prison, I'd think about what Grossman was up against in his life and times as a writer, and it'd be enough so as I'd stop feeling sorry for myself.

Life and Fate is about war. It's about other things. It's also about prison. All the prisons everywhere. And still it's about more than that. If you haven't read this, you actually need to.

So there's the list. I hope you like these. If you've already read them, you could reread them and that way no one feels left out. Take care of yourself. Good luck.

Nico Walker's Cherry arrives in U.S. stores on Aug. 14. Don’t forget to add it to your Want to Read shelf.



31 Adaptations that Prove Hollywood Loves YA
Posted by Cybil on July 30, 2018


From The Hunger Games to The Fault in Our Stars, some of Hollywood's biggest movies began as beloved young adult novels.

It's a trend that's showing no signs of slowing down. In August alone, movie versions of The Darkest Minds starring Amandla Stenberg and The Miseducation of Cameron Post starring Chloë Grace Moretz arrive, along with the Netflix adaptation of Jenny Han's To All the Boys I've Loved Before. Later this year, moviegoers will see the adaptation of Angie Thomas' 2017 Goodreads Choice Award-winning debut, The Hate U Give.

Because we're always on Team Read the Book, check out this list of YA novels that have been adapted for film and television. Which ones are your favorite reads, and which ones are you adding to your Want to Read shelf?


Dystopia & Science Fiction
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Contemporary Love Stories
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Fantasy
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But wait! There's more...
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What adapted YA novel would you recommend as a great read? Let us know in the comments!

Check out the complete coverage of YA Week:
45 Hidden Gems for YA Superfans
The Most Anticipated YA Books
The Top 100 YA Books on Goodreads

The Most Anticipated YA Books
Posted by Hayley on July 30, 2018


While 2018 has already been a wildly entertaining year for YA fans, the best may be yet to come. From big series conclusions by Sarah J. Maas and Cassandra Clare to irresistible twists on classics like Frankenstein and Pride and Prejudice, these bold books have something enticing for every type of reader.

To find the best books that will be hitting bookshelves through the rest of the year, we focused on what Goodreads members are anticipating and reactions from early reviewers. We measured anticipation by how many times a book has been added to Want to Read shelves, and then we only included books that have earned at least a four-star rating. (If you're curious how you can read prepublished books and be among the first to rate them, take a look at our book giveaways.)

Check out the most anticipated YA books in all your favorite genres below. Don't forget to add what catches your eye to your Want to Read shelf!


Fantasy

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Yumeko is more than a peasant girl. A kitsune shapeshifter, half human and half fox, she escapes demons and defies a samurai to find the Scroll of a Thousand Prayers, an ancient artifact with the power to summon a dragon and grant any wish.


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Once there were three sisters, equal heirs to the crown, struggling to control their magic and destiny. Now Mirabella and Arisonoe hide in the shadows while Katharine sits on the throne in this epic installment in the Three Dark Crowns series.


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She has been a slave, a king's assassin, and a queen. As Aelin Galathynius' heroic journey comes to an end, she finds herself a captive of the Fae, helpless as war erupts across her world in this seventh and final book in the Throne of Glass series.


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The demon king of Ikhara entertains himself with his Paper Girls, consorts chosen from the lowest and most oppressed caste. The young women are trained to be charming, timid, and obedient. But what happens when two of them fall in love?


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In this dazzling sequel to Strange the Dreamer, Lazlo and Sarai grapple with their new identities as god and ghost. As forgotten doors are opened and new worlds are revealed, they both question what makes anyone a hero—or a monster.


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The Shadowhunters have become the hunted. To end a deadly curse and stop a civil war, Julian and Emma put aside their forbidden love to retrieve the Black Volume of the Dead in this thrilling final novel in The Dark Artifices trilogy.


Historical Fiction

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Elizabeth has nothing; Victor Frankenstein has everything—except a friend. In 18th century Geneva, an inseparable bond forms, but as the years pass, Victor's dangerous temper and depraved dreams threaten to sink both their lives into darkness.


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Weary of lovestruck suitors and the patriarchy, Felicity escapes the confines of stuffy English society via pirate ship. Her impulsive decision leads her on a perilous quest from the German countryside to secrets lurking beneath the Atlantic.


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Five generations of a single African and American family pursue an elusive dream of freedom, from 18-year-old Liberian Togar, who's on the run from government militia, to the Wright siblings as they flee a Virginia plantation in 1827.


Mystery

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Sadie's sister is dead. Determined to bring the killer to justice, she leaves her life behind. As she follows the meager clues, radio personality West McCray is on her trail, eager to turn her quest for revenge into a hit true-crime podcast.


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After her father is framed for murder, Ky returns to her hometown, hoping for sanctuary. Instead, she finds herself at the center of a scandal. With a rookie FBI agent as her only ally, she sets out to expose the town's hidden skeletons.


Science Fiction

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On the neon-lit streets of a near-future Tokyo, hacker Emika Chen teams up with the Phoenix Riders to stop the nefarious plans of elusive young billionaire Hideo Tanaka, the man she thought she loved, in this stunning sequel to Warcross.


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After an unsuccessful alien invasion, a fragile peace exists between humans and the conquered Luxen race. None of it concerns Evie until she meets the otherworldly Luc in this book set in the world of Armentrout's Lux series.


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Nax and his fellow space academy rejects are the sole witnesses to the biggest crime in the history of space colonization—and the perfect scapegoats. On the run, the misfits just need to stay alive long enough to tell their story.


Contemporary

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Darius speaks more Klingon than Farsi, and he knows more Hobbit social cues than Persian ones. On a trip to Iran, he shocks himself by making his first true friend. Sohrab is the boy next door, and he makes Darius dread returning to America.


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The Bennets get a Brooklyn update in this vibrant retelling of Pride and Prejudice. Here it's Zuri Benitez, proud of her Afro-Latino roots, resisting the uptight charms of the wealthy Darcy in her rapidly gentrifying neighborhood.


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The universe threw them together, and now the universe is keeping them apart. Holding on to the optimism Broadway has taught him, Arthur keeps trying to make things work with Ben. But what if life really isn’t like a musical? And what if it is?


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Shirin is tired of being a stereotype. It is a year after 9/11, and the rude comments—about her race, her religion, the hijab she wears—will not stop. She withdraws inward until a strange boy named Ocean James insists on getting to know the real her.


Which YA book are you most excited to get your hands on? Tell us why in the comments!

Check out complete coverage of YA Week:
The Top 100 YA Books on Goodreads
45 Hidden Gems for YA Superfans
The Best YA Books of 2018 (So Far)

YA Week 2018
Posted by Hayley on July 30, 2018


Within the pages of these YA books, adventure awaits. Whether you're a fan of dystopian rebels or high school sweethearts, mischievous royals or small-town sleuths, we've got irresistible book recommendations just for you.


The Top 100 Young Adult Books on Goodreads
From The Hunger Games to The Hate U Give, check out our readers' favorite picks.

45 Hidden Gems for YA Fans
Discover new reads based on classics.
Best YA Books of 2018 (So Far)
Explore the greatest stories of the year.


Most Anticipated YA Books
The best may be yet to come…
Beloved YA Book Adaptations
Grab the popcorn, readers.





What will you be reading for YA Week?

Let us know in the comments!


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